Aboriginal Stolen Generation Essay

The Stolen Generations Essay

The Stolen Generation

The land mark event I have chosen to focus on for this section of the Assessment Event is the removal of Aboriginal children, 'The Stolen Generation/s', from their traditional homes and their parents. I will endeavour to discuss the effects of one particular government policy, that is the 'Assimilation Policy', and the effects which it had on the indigenous population during the time it was enacted and the effects which it has had and has on the Aboriginal population within Australia today. The 'Stolen Generations' policy was clearly enacted and implemented prior to 1975. However, its implications have subsequently been felt and continue to be felt by both indigenous and non-indigenous societies.

The Assimilation Policy was introduced after the Protectorate experiment, which had existed from 1833 to 1972, failed. 'The government response to this failure was to remove indigenous people from their traditional lands and place them onto reserves, here they were placed under the control of the Chief Protector or Protection Board, the Chief Protector was made the legal guardian of all Aboriginal children, displacing the rights of parents. The management of the reserves was delegated to government appointed managers or missionaries in receipt of government subsidies.'(Bringing Them Home Report)

Such policies and actions surely would have created a mixture of thoughts, emotions and responses from most societies that were subjected to them, not just Aboriginal societies. They surely would have felt and indeed would still be feeling, confused, angry, bewildered and resentful. The European societies, and particularly the 'zealous missionaries whose initial goal was to Christianise the heathen savages' children' (Sociology of Education: p198) viewed the Aboriginal societies as savage. However, when one considers what the Aboriginal people were actually suffering as a result of these policies and actions, one must wonder who really were the savages.

The forced removal of children from their families took place under the regulations and guidelines of this Policy, 'The `protectionist' legislation was generally used in preference to the general child welfare legislation to remove Aboriginal children. That way government officials, acting under the authority of the Chief Protector or the Board, could simply order the removal of an Aboriginal child without having to establish to a court's satisfaction that the child was neglected.' (Bringing Them Home Report) Purely because the policy was an official government policy based on official legislation, many non- Aboriginal people, especially those within government and government...

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The impacts of the Stolen Generation on Australian Life Essay

1600 Words7 Pages

The Stolen Generation has had a great effect on Aboriginal rights and freedoms as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders didn’t even have the rights to raise and look after their children and as a result 100,000 Aboriginal Australian’s were displaced and placed into white families. The lack of understanding and respect for Aboriginal culture also meant that many people who supported the removal of these children really thought they were doing “the right thing”. The impact on Australian life today is still being felt as the Stolen Generation is seen as a recent event has it only ended in the early 1970s. Children that where taken away back then now cannot trace back their roots and therefore have no record of their family history or where…show more content…

The Stolen Generation has had a great effect on Aboriginal rights and freedoms as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders didn’t even have the rights to raise and look after their children and as a result 100,000 Aboriginal Australian’s were displaced and placed into white families. The lack of understanding and respect for Aboriginal culture also meant that many people who supported the removal of these children really thought they were doing “the right thing”. The impact on Australian life today is still being felt as the Stolen Generation is seen as a recent event has it only ended in the early 1970s. Children that where taken away back then now cannot trace back their roots and therefore have no record of their family history or where they come from and is still causing problems today.
The Stolen Generation is seen as a grave chapter in our countries history and in Aboriginal History. Stolen Generation didn’t come to light until the 1960s and early 1970s with public shock and anger. The rights of Aboriginal peoples during this point were increasingly low as many were forced to live on reserves or missions and their children were taken at a young age. The rights of the stolen generation were somewhat better than their previous generation as they had a right to have a good job, health care and have and raise children as their parents had none of these rights. The assimilation program was a way to turn these Aboriginal children and essential “turn them white”; this can be

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