Cause And Effect Essay Layout Apa

Remember when that annoying light came on while you were driving home last night? Turns out it really did serve a purpose—to tell you one of your tires was low.

Unfortunately, you ignored the warning light. Unfortunately, you missed class because of your flat tire this morning. Because you missed class, you failed a quiz.

This is a perfect example of cause and effect.

The problem: Another light appeared on your dashboard.

The cause: Low air pressure in a tire.

The effects: You missed class. Because you missed class, you didn’t realize there would be a quiz next week, and you failed the quiz.

Writing an effective cause and effect essay isn’t that different from the facts of this scenario. You’ll outline the causes, the effects, or both the causes and effects of a specific problem or issue.

To better illustrate this, let’s take a look at the basics of this essay type before we dive into two cause and effect essay examples.

Basic Training: Cause and Effect Essays

In order to understand how to write a good cause and effect essay, you need to know four basic points.

#1 Know the purpose of the assignment

In order to write an effective essay, you need to follow your professor’s guidelines.

If your topic is childhood obesity, are you supposed to write about the causes, the effects, or about both the causes and effects of childhood obesity?

Paying attention to guidelines really does make a difference in your grade! Know what you’re supposed to be writing before you begin.

#2 Draft a thesis statement

The thesis statement will establish the focus for your paper. In a cause and effect essay, your thesis should let readers know if you’re writing about causes, effects, or both.

Check out these examples:

Thesis statements about obesity might look like one of these.

If the focus of your paper is the causes of obesity, your thesis statement might be something like this:

Children today are increasingly overweight primarily due to overconsumption of highly processed foods.

If the focus of your paper is the effects of obesity, your thesis statement might be something like this:

The recent increase in childhood obesity has resulted in children suffering from numerous health problems, including high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol, and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

If the focus of your paper is both causes and effects of obesity, your thesis statement might be something like this:

Due to overconsumption of highly processed foods, childhood obesity is becoming epidemic and leaving children with numerous health problems, such as high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol, and increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

#3 Organize evidence

If you start writing with a jumbled mess of thoughts in your head, your paper is likely going to end up a jumbled mess.

Organize your ideas by starting with a simple chart like this (fancy colors optional, of course). It’s a quick way to list information before you actually begin writing.

You may not end up using all of the causes and effects listed in your chart. But by listing as many as you can think of, you’ll be able to choose the best options for your paper.

#4 Use transitions

Readers need to be able to see how you’re connecting ideas. Move from one idea to the next by using the right transitions and transition sentences.

Here’s a list of transitions you might use in your own cause and effect paper:

  • due to
  • since
  • because
  • if…then
  • consequently
  • as a result
  • therefore
  • so
  • thus

And for nearly endless transitional possibilities, check out 97 Transition Words for Essays You Need to Know.

With basic training complete, let’s take a look at two cause and effect essay examples. Then you can see what these elements look like in an actual paper.

2 Cause and Effect Essay Examples That Will Cause a Stir

Essay Example #1: Examining Childhood Obesity

This essay  causes a stir not because it’s an amazing paper but because it’s still in need of some revision.

It’s a good start to a cause and effect essay but struggles to get it right.

The essay does provide an overview of the topic, lists causes and effects, and uses transitions. But it has its share of concerns too.

One of the key problems in the introductions is the lack of a thesis statement. At the end of the first paragraph, it does have a broad overview. However, it lacks the specificity of a strong thesis statement.

The body of the paper struggles with organization. It does includes a lot of ideas and research. But it doesn’t quite organize and develop them.

While the paper uses transitions to link ideas, it goes overboard. It includes transitions to link lists of statements rather than introduce fully developed arguments.

Finally, the conclusion is almost non-existent. A Works Cited is also missing.

Hopefully that helps you avoid some of these issues in your own essay. Now let’s dive into the second of our two cause and effect essay examples.

Essay Example #2: The Negative Effects of Technology

Though this paper struggles a bit with organization, it does include a clear thesis, use of transitions to link ideas, and a basic discussion of the negative effects of technology.

Note that this paper uses evidence from sources to support ideas but doesn’t always use proper in-text citations and does not include a Works Cited. Both of these are required in MLA format.

Training Complete

Congratulations! Your basic training using cause and effect essay examples is complete.

Now that you know the basic components of a cause and effect essay and can spot them in a sample essay, it’s time to put pen to paper (or fingers to keyboard).

Remember the weak elements in the cause and effect essay examples as you write your own essay to make yours shine.

If you’ve drafted some causes and effects to your topic but are stumped as to how to put them into essay format, try outlining. (Read How to Write a 5-Paragraph Essay Outline.)

After you’ve outlined and have a complete draft, send your paper to a Kibin editor to make sure your paper is in good shape!

Psst... 98% of Kibin users report better grades! Get inspiration from over 500,000 example essays.

Expository Essays

Summary:

The Modes of Discourse—Exposition, Description, Narration, Argumentation (EDNA)—are common paper assignments you may encounter in your writing classes. Although these genres have been criticized by some composition scholars, the Purdue OWL recognizes the wide spread use of these approaches and students’ need to understand and produce them.

Contributors: Jack Baker, Allen Brizee, Elizabeth Angeli
Last Edited: 2013-03-11 10:04:15

What is an expository essay?

The expository essay is a genre of essay that requires the student to investigate an idea, evaluate evidence, expound on the idea, and set forth an argument concerning that idea in a clear and concise manner. This can be accomplished through comparison and contrast, definition, example, the analysis of cause and effect, etc.

Please note: This genre is commonly assigned as a tool for classroom evaluation and is often found in various exam formats.

The structure of the expository essay is held together by the following.

  • A clear, concise, and defined thesis statement that occurs in the first paragraph of the essay.

It is essential that this thesis statement be appropriately narrowed to follow the guidelines set forth in the assignment. If the student does not master this portion of the essay, it will be quite difficult to compose an effective or persuasive essay.

  • Clear and logical transitions between the introduction, body, and conclusion.

Transitions are the mortar that holds the foundation of the essay together. Without logical progression of thought, the reader is unable to follow the essay’s argument, and the structure will collapse.

  • Body paragraphs that include evidential support.

Each paragraph should be limited to the exposition of one general idea. This will allow for clarity and direction throughout the essay. What is more, such conciseness creates an ease of readability for one’s audience. It is important to note that each paragraph in the body of the essay must have some logical connection to the thesis statement in the opening paragraph.

  • Evidential support (whether factual, logical, statistical, or anecdotal).

Often times, students are required to write expository essays with little or no preparation; therefore, such essays do not typically allow for a great deal of statistical or factual evidence.

Though creativity and artfulness are not always associated with essay writing, it is an art form nonetheless. Try not to get stuck on the formulaic nature of expository writing at the expense of writing something interesting. Remember, though you may not be crafting the next great novel, you are attempting to leave a lasting impression on the people evaluating your essay.

  • A conclusion that does not simply restate the thesis, but readdresses it in light of the evidence provided.

It is at this point of the essay that students will inevitably begin to struggle. This is the portion of the essay that will leave the most immediate impression on the mind of the reader. Therefore, it must be effective and logical. Do not introduce any new information into the conclusion; rather, synthesize and come to a conclusion concerning the information presented in the body of the essay.

A complete argument

Perhaps it is helpful to think of an essay in terms of a conversation or debate with a classmate. If I were to discuss the cause of the Great Depression and its current effect on those who lived through the tumultuous time, there would be a beginning, middle, and end to the conversation. In fact, if I were to end the exposition in the middle of my second point, questions would arise concerning the current effects on those who lived through the Depression. Therefore, the expository essay must be complete, and logically so, leaving no doubt as to its intent or argument.

The five-paragraph Essay

A common method for writing an expository essay is the five-paragraph approach. This is, however, by no means the only formula for writing such essays. If it sounds straightforward, that is because it is; in fact, the method consists of:

  1. an introductory paragraph
  2. three evidentiary body paragraphs
  3. a conclusion

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